110: Psalms 55:12-14


COPYRIGHT WARNING

365 Prophecies: Prophecy 110

The Messiah will be betrayed by a close friend, one who was a part of His ministry.

Old Testament Prediction:

Psalms 55:12-14 “For it is not an enemy who reproaches me; Then I could bear it. Nor is it one who hates me who has exalted himself against me; Then I could hide from him. But it was you, a man my equal, My companion and my acquaintance. We took sweet counsel together, And walked to the house of God in the throng.”

New Testament Fulfillment:

John 13:18 “I do not speak concerning all of you. I know whom I have chosen; but that the Scripture may be fulfilled, ‘He who eats bread with Me has lifted up his heel against Me.’ ”
John 13:21-27 When Jesus had said these things, He was troubled in spirit, and testified and said, “Most assuredly, I say to you, one of you will betray Me.” Then the disciples looked at one another, perplexed about whom He spoke. Now there was leaning on Jesus’ bosom one of His disciples, whom Jesus loved. Simon Peter therefore motioned to him to ask who it was of whom He spoke. Then, leaning back on Jesus’ breast, he said to Him, “Lord, who is it?” Jesus answered, “It is he to whom I shall give a piece of bread when I have dipped it.” And having dipped the bread, He gave it to Judas Iscariot, the son of Simon. Now after the piece of bread, Satan entered him. Then Jesus said to him, “What you do, do quickly.

Application:

A repeat of Prophecy 104, from Psalms 41:9.

Psalms 41:9 “Even my own familiar friend in whom I trusted, Who ate my bread, Has lifted up his heel against me.”

Both Psalms 41 and 55 were written by David after his son Absalom and close friend—Ahithophel, plotted against David, in 2 Samuel 16:15-17:23. David writes from a broken heart after being betrayed. His cry to God is one that we can certainly identify with, if we ourselves, have had a close friend betray us.

Psalms 55:1-11 Give ear to my prayer, O God, And do not hide Yourself from my supplication. Attend to me, and hear me; I am restless in my complaint, and moan noisily, Because of the voice of the enemy, Because of the oppression of the wicked; For they bring down trouble upon me, And in wrath they hate me. My heart is severely pained within me, And the terrors of death have fallen upon me. Fearfulness and trembling have come upon me, And horror has overwhelmed me. So I said, “Oh, that I had wings like a dove! I would fly away and be at rest. Indeed, I would wander far off, And remain in the wilderness. Selah I would hasten my escape From the windy storm and tempest.” Destroy, O Lord, and divide their tongues, For I have seen violence and strife in the city. Day and night they go around it on its walls; Iniquity and trouble are also in the midst of it. Destruction is in its midst; Oppression and deceit do not depart from its streets.

There is no doubt that Ahithophel is the subject of David’s words in these two Psalms. We do find, however, that in the New Testament, Jesus quotes from Psalm 41 in speaking of His own betrayal by Judas Iscariot.

John 13:18 “I do not speak concerning all of you. I know whom I have chosen; but that the Scripture may be fulfilled, ‘He who eats bread with Me has lifted up his heel against Me.’ ”

Since we know for certain that David was writing both Psalms after his experience of betrayal with Ahithophel, it is reasonable that Jesus, in quoting Psalm 41, is also thinking of Psalm 55. Jesus states that Judas’ betrayal was a fulfillment of Old Testament Prophecy, specifically Prophecy 104, Psalms 41; and Prophecy 110, Psalms 55.

Psalms 55:12-14 “For it is not an enemy who reproaches me; Then I could bear it. Nor is it one who hates me who has exalted himself against me; Then I could hide from him. But it was you, a man my equal, My companion and my acquaintance. We took sweet counsel together, And walked to the house of God in the throng.”

Psalms 41:9 “Even my own familiar friend in whom I trusted, Who ate my bread, Has lifted up his heel against me.”

It is possible that Ahithophel was a close relative of Uriah and Bathsheba to whom David had brought so much pain and suffering. Ahithophel, convincing David’s son Absalom to take his counsel against his father, may have betrayed David as an act of revenge for the murder and adultery that destroyed Uriah and Bathsheba’s lives.

There are nine ways in which Ahithophel and Judas are alike:

  1. They were both trusted friends of David and Jesus.
  2. They both betrayed their friend.
  3. They are said to have “loved” their masters.
  4. They “lifted up themselves” against their friends.
  5. They betrayed the trust that was placed in them.
  6. Both were counselors or advisors.
  7. They enjoyed fellowship with their masters.
  8. They worshipped God together.
  9. Their families were close.

Many years ago, one of my closest and dearest friends, misunderstood the circumstantial events of a particular difficulty I was enduring. While I was aware that my friend was simply misinformed, I could not persuade him otherwise. As he began to convey his thoughts to others who were also my friends, they believed his report and ceased their fellowship with me. The problem in having a false rumor spread—is the difficulty in disproving a negative once it has been stated amongst many people. This trusted friend, to whom I had worshipped the Lord with and placed a great deal of trust in, caused immense loss to myself and my ministry. Betrayal is one of life’s most painful experiences and one that leaves you with great suffering.

David understood the emotional desolation that betrayal by a close friend, leaves behind. We learn in this 110th Prophecy that Jesus also suffered at the betrayal of Judas. The fact that the Old Testament predicts this betrayal in such vivid detail, is a further validation of Jesus as the fulfillment of all the prophecies concerning the promised Messiah.

See also, Prophecy 140, The Messiah will be betrayed by a close friend who will be replaced by another.


Comments
  1. Jesus Christ was betrayed by Judas .Why does the new testament have a book named with the name Judas?

    Like

    • Rob Robinson says:

      You are speaking of the book of Jude. This writer is the brother of James, the half brother of Jesus; not Judas Iscariot who betrayed Jesus.

      The name Judas or Jude was a very common name during that time.

      Like

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