Arriving At Jerusalem

As a person begins to read and understand the many things that were written by the Hebrew prophets, concerning the coming Messiah, a new sense of wonder ensues. How could these men know about events that would not take place for hundreds of years? We should understand that these prophets of old were not seeking to impress people with their predictive ability; they were simply seeking to communicate a message that God had given them.

Today, we think of someone who claims to be “a prophet,” as a person who needs psychological help. During the time that these men wrote these prophetic words, it was well known that God spoke to the masses of people—through the words of His prophets. In order that people might know whether or not a man was a true prophet of God, they would test the words of these men to see if they came to pass—precisely as they had spoken.

It was the intent of God that by fulfilled prophecy, we would understand that the source of the words contained in the Bible are from God, not from man.

Deuteronomy 18:21-22 And if you say in your heart, “How shall we know the word which the LORD has not spoken?” —when a prophet speaks in the name of the LORD, if the thing does not happen or come to pass, that is the thing which the LORD has not spoken; the prophet has spoken it presumptuously; you shall not be afraid of him.

Romans 4:17 God, who… calls those things which do not exist as though they did…

The test for whether a word spoken by someone who claims to be a prophet of God is valid, is determined by their fulfillment. If any word or part of the prophecy fails, the person who spoke the prediction is called a false prophet; and no one should listen to that person.[1] If, however, the words that are spoken in each of these prophecies come to pass exactly as they were written, then we can have confidence that God is the original source of these predictions.

Only an intelligent being with knowledge of every event that will take place in the history of the world would possess the ability to tell us what will take place in the future. Since no human being has this capacity of omniscience, the origin of all these prophecies cannot be human.

In this chapter, we see that the specific place where the Messiah would be introduced to the world was described by Isaiah—long before His arrival

The Messiah will announce His arrival at Zion (Jerusalem).

Isaiah 59:20 “The Redeemer will come to Zion, And to those who turn from transgression in Jacob,” Says the LORD.

New Testament Fulfillment:

Matthew 21:1-11 Now when they drew near Jerusalem, and came to Bethphage, at the Mount of Olives, then Jesus sent two disciples, saying to them, “Go into the village opposite you, and immediately you will find a donkey tied, and a colt with her. Loose them and bring them to Me. And if anyone says anything to you, you shall say, ‘The Lord has need of them,’ and immediately he will send them.” All this was done that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet, saying: “Tell the daughter of Zion, ‘Behold, your King is coming to you, Lowly, and sitting on a donkey, A colt, the foal of a donkey.’ ” So the disciples went and did as Jesus commanded them. They brought the donkey and the colt, laid their clothes on them, and set Him on them. And a very great multitude spread their clothes on the road; others cut down branches from the trees and spread them on the road. Then the multitudes who went before and those who followed cried out, saying: “Hosanna to the Son of David! ‘Blessed is He who comes in the name of the LORD!’ Hosanna in the highest!” And when He had come into Jerusalem, all the city was moved, saying, “Who is this?” So the multitudes said, “This is Jesus, the prophet from Nazareth of Galilee.”

Following a Plan

This prophecy of Isaiah describes the Messiah making His arrival at Jerusalem (Zion).

It is interesting that the disciples, on a few occasions, sought to convince Jesus to go to Jerusalem and declare His identity. It is certain that by this time, the men who were closest to Jesus had already come to understand that He was the Messiah. It it also likely that they understood from certain scriptures, such as this prophecy from Isaiah 59:20, that the Messiah would be revealed at Jerusalem. On all former occasions, Jesus’ response was always the same: My time has not yet come…

John 7:6-7 Then Jesus said to them, “My time has not yet come, but your time is always ready. 8 You go up to this feast. I am not yet going up to this feast, for My time has not yet fully come.”

From His response, we can see that Jesus was aligning His life with the prophetic word. Everything that He said and did was centered around the predictions that had been made regarding the coming of the Messiah. We observe that Jesus had knowledge of events that were going to happen. He knew the precise moment when He was supposed to reveal Himself as the Messiah at Jerusalem.

This is the subject of this book: To demonstrate that Jesus was not only seeking to fulfill all the prophecies of the Messiah, but that He did in fact fulfill all of them, perfectly.

When the time came for Jesus to fulfill this prophecy of Isaiah 59:20, He determined to put things in the order that they should be. He accomplished each part of every prophecy with extreme precision. He did this so that all that was written about Him would turn out exactly as it was spoken by God—through the Old Testament prophets who recorded these events.

On the precise day required, at the exact time, Jesus instructs His disciples to go to Bethphage at the Mount of Olives and find a donkey tied together with her colt. This will set into motion the precise fulfillment of the Messiah coming into Jerusalem (Zion), as Isaiah predicted.

Matthew 21:1-9 Now when they drew near Jerusalem, and came to Bethphage, at the Mount of Olives, then Jesus sent two disciples, 2 saying to them, “Go into the village opposite you, and immediately you will find a donkey tied, and a colt with her. Loose them and bring them to Me. 3 And if anyone says anything to you, you shall say, “The Lord has need of them,’ and immediately he will send them.” 4 All this was done that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet, saying: 5 “Tell the daughter of Zion, ‘Behold, your King is coming to you, Lowly, and sitting on a donkey, A colt, the foal of a donkey.’ ”6 So the disciples went and did as Jesus commanded them. 7 They brought the donkey and the colt, laid their clothes on them, and set Him on them. 8 And a very great multitude spread their clothes on the road; others cut down branches from the trees and spread them on the road. 9 Then the multitudes who went before and those who followed cried out, saying: “Hosanna to the Son of David! ‘Blessed is He who comes in the name of the LORD!’ Hosanna in the highest!”

What Jesus asked of the disciples caused the fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy of the Messiah coming to Zion, as well as Zechariah’s prophecy of the Messiah coming to Zion on the foal of a donkey.

Bringing Salvation Zechariah 9:9 “Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion! Shout, O daughter of Jerusalem! Behold, your King is coming to you; He is just and having salvation, Lowly and riding on a donkey, A colt, the foal of a donkey.

Each part of Zechariah’s prophecy that describes the fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy of the Messiah’s revealing at Jerusalem, is detailed in each of the following prophecies:

The Messiah will be Revealed at Jerusalem.
Zechariah 9:9a “Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion! Shout, O daughter of Jerusalem! Behold, your King is coming to you…”

The Messiah will be Proclaimed as King and “The Son of David,” at Jerusalem.
Zechariah 9:9b “Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion! Shout, O daughter of Jerusalem! Behold, your King is coming to you…”

Notice how the words of both prophets work together in perfect harmony, though they wrote nearly 200 years apart.[2]

Isaiah: 740-680 B.C.
Zechariah: 520-518 B.C.

The specific details of the Messiah’s arrival on one predetermined day that was predicted by Daniel—is found in the chapter; “Arrival of The Messiah,” Daniel 9:25.

As Judah has been in captivity at Babylon for 70 years, Daniel realizes from reading the prophecies of Jeremiah, that the time of their captivity is nearly at an end. In response to this knowledge, Daniel begins to pray for his nation and people. Before Daniel has concluded his intercession, the angel Gabriel comes to reveal the greatest and most amazing prophecy in the Bible.

Gabriel informs Daniel that from the moment that he determined to pray for his nation and people, God had heard him. Gabriel was dispatched by God to give Daniel the final set of prophecies concerning Israel and the last days—which would usher in the arrival of the Messiah at Jerusalem. These prophecies would include the death of the Messiah and the destruction of Israel in 70 A. D.

At the death of Messiah there will be a break in the further fulfillment of Daniel’s prophecy. Beginning at verse 27 of Daniel chapter 9, the prophet is looking ahead to the final seven years of the present age, called the Tribulation period. During this time, a world leader, described as the antichrist and the beast, will institute a peace plan between Israel and the surrounding nations for seven years. In the midst of the seven years (3 ½ years), the antichrist will break this treaty and announce to Israel and the world—that he is God. This event is described as: The Abomination of Desolation. This act will place into motion the 21 judgments, described by chapters 6-18 in the Book of Revelation. After Seven-Seals, Seven-Trumpets, and Seven-Bowl judgments—at the end of 1,260 days—Jesus will return with His church, to destroy the antichrist and his waiting armies.

The timing of Daniel’s prophecy

Daniel is told that from the issuing of the command to return to Israel and rebuild the city and the temple, there will be “seventy-seven” sets of weeks, or 483 years, until the Messiah arrives in Israel.

On March 14, 445 B.C., Encyclopedia Britannica and other historical documents record that Artaxerxes Longimanus issued a decree that the Jews should return to Jerusalem.

Considering the change of the calendar from the post exile of Israel in Babylon, which was based on 360 days per year, to the current calendar of 364.25 days per year, accounting for all of the leap years, Sir Robert Anderson of the Royal Observatory in England determined by precise calculations, that the time determined by Daniel’s prophecy was 179,880 days.

From March 14, 445 B.C., adding 179,880 days, we come to April 6, 32 A. D.—the precise day that Jesus rode into Jerusalem, on Palm Sunday, and announced for the first time that He was the Messiah, the son of David. This event is described in Matthew 21:1-11.

It was on this day that Jesus told His disciples to bring the foal of a donkey and lead Him into Jerusalem, where He was proclaimed the Messiah to Israel. Jesus fulfilled this 277th prophecy of Isaiah, on April 6, 32 A.D. On every other occasion that Jesus was encouraged to declare that He was the Messiah at Jerusalem, He refused. When this specific day spoken of by Daniel arrived, Jesus allowed those who witnessed His arrival to proclaim Him as the Messiah, in fulfillment of Isaiah and many other Old Testament prophecies.

See: “Arriving on One Day,” for the specific day that predicts the arrival of the Messiah.

The following are a few of the more important prophecies that concern the fulfillment of Daniel’s prophecies by Jesus, as He is revealed as the Messiah at Jerusalem:

A period of Seventy Weeks are determined for Israel—to finish her transgressions and bring the arrival of the Messiah.

Daniel 9:24a “Seventy weeks are determined For your people and for your holy city, To finish the transgression, To make an end of sins, To make reconciliation for iniquity, To bring in everlasting righteousness, To seal up vision and prophecy, And to anoint the Most Holy.”

Seventy Weeks of years are determined for Israel and the coming of the Messiah.

Daniel 9:24b “Seventy weeks are determined For your people and for your holy city, To finish the transgression, To make an end of sins, To make reconciliation for iniquity, To bring in everlasting righteousness, To seal up vision and prophecy, And to anoint the Most Holy.”

The Messiah will come Sixty-Nine Weeks from the command to restore and rebuild Jerusalem.

Daniel 9:25 “Know therefore and understand, That from the going forth of the command To restore and build Jerusalem Until Messiah the Prince, There shall be seven weeks and sixty-two weeks; The street shall be built again, and the wall, Even in troublesome times.”

The Messiah will be Cut off or killed, in the midst of His ministry.

Daniel 9:26a “And after the sixty-two weeks Messiah shall be cut off…

The Messiah will not be put to death for His own sins but for the sins of the whole world.

Daniel 9:26b “And after the sixty-two weeks Messiah shall be cut off, but not for Himself…

The Messiah will return to earth a second time, during the final Gentile kingdom of the antichrist which will be a revived Roman Empire. He shall commit “The Abomination of Desolation” in the Temple.

Daniel 9:26c “And after the sixty-two weeks Messiah shall be cut off, but not for Himself; And the people of the prince who is to come Shall destroy the city and the sanctuary. The end of it shall be with a flood, And till the end of the war desolations are determined.”

We begin to understand that the Bible is not simply a book of myth’s and tales; it is a book about the mysteries of the universe. No man has the power to write the prophecies that these ancient prophets penned—apart from a transmittal of knowledge by a transcendent source.

When we consider how these many predictions line up with each other, though they were written by many authors, over thousands of years; we understand that this is not the work of men, but of God.

In the next chapter we learn that the arrival of the Messiah will take place on one day that was chosen from eternity. A day that had been set apart—to reveal to the world, the most extraordinary person who has ever lived.


[1] Deuteronomy 18
[2] According to the Scofield Study Bible Notes on each of these two prophets.