When Were The Gospels Written?

When the Gospels of Jesus were written is of paramount importance. Liberal scholars assert that they were written late in the first century by non-eyewitnesses. If this is true then the entire premise of the New Testament is lost. Ancient texts written decades after the events took place, by people who did not see what they are writing, is of very little value today.

Fortunately for our generation, we have surviving manuscript copies of the New Testament that are dated as early as 175 A.D. The existence of manuscript copies from 175 A.D., demands that the original autographs must have been written early in the first century.[A]

In 59 A.D., Paul is before Porcius Festus, the Procurator of Judea while Paul is a prisoner at Cesarea. We know that Festus was here at this date because of coinage that has survived history with the Provincial coinage of Judea attesting to Nero’s 5th year.[2] This documents Porcius Festus in Judea at 58-59 A.D., with Paul before him.

Paul had his final hearing with Festus in Acts 24:27. In Acts 25:12, Festus told Paul to go to Jerusalem to be tried. Paul states he is a Roman citizen and appeals to Caesar. Festus sends Paul to Rome for trial before Nero.

  • Eusebius writes that Paul was beheaded by Nero in June of 68 A.D. This is verified by the death of Nero on June 8, 68 A.D.[3] Epaphroditos, the secretary of Nero, requested that he kill him as Nero did not have the courage to do it himself.[4]
  • The text of Luke was written before Acts, his second book. Luke writes about Paul in his missionary journeys in the book of Acts.
  • In the letter to Galatians, Paul describes a conversation he had with Peter and James, 14 years before he wrote Galatians (Galatians 2:1).
  • In Paul’s letter to Timothy (1 Timothy 5:18), he quotes the precise words of Jesus that Luke had recorded in his Gospel, Luke 10:7: “The laborer is worthy of his wages.” This quote by Jesus, recorded by Luke, is not in any of the other Gospels. Paul quotes Luke verbatim. This means that Luke’s Gospel was written before 1 Timothy.

Luke states at the beginning of his Gospel that he obtained the testimony for his Gospel from the eyewitnesses who had been with Jesus from the beginning. This means that Matthew and Mark must have written their Gospels before Luke.

If We Follow The Timeline From The Above Evidence, We Arrive At The Following:

  • 59 A.D. Paul before Festus
  • 14 years before, Paul begins his ministry. This brings us to 45 A.D.
  • 45 A.D. When Paul began his ministry.
  • 32 A.D. Jesus was crucified and rose from the dead.
  • 32 A.D. to 43 A.D., Matthew and Mark wrote their Gospels.
  • 44 A.D. Luke wrote his Gospel.
  • 45 A.D. Paul begins his ministry.
  • 46 A.D. Luke begins to write Acts

When we examine the internal text of the New Testament we find that the documents themselves provide us with evidence of a very early date of writing.

  1. Jesus repeatedly stated that He called 12 men to act as His witnesses. “And you are my witnesses, telling people about me everywhere—in Jerusalem, throughout Judea, in Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.” ~Acts 1:8
  2. Jesus told these 12 Apostles that they would tell the whole world what they had seen and heard. “And you must also testify about me because you have been with me from the beginning of my ministry.” ~John 15:27
  3. Jesus certainly intended that these men would immediately write and send their written testimony to the world, describing all they had seen and heard, because it was not possible for them to travel the entire world on foot. Jesus made it clear that the time to go was immediate, not decades later. “Therefore, go and make disciples of all the nations.” ~Matthew 28:19
  4. Jesus said that after He was raised from the dead, He would send the Holy Spirit to remind them all He had said and done. “But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name, He will teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all things that I said to you.” ~John 14:26
  5. Just prior to His return to heaven, Jesus instructed the Apostles to wait at Jerusalem for the arrival of the Holy Spirit who would enable them to remember and write their testimony: “But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes upon you. And you will be my witnesses, telling people about me everywhere—in Jerusalem, throughout Judea, in Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.” ~Acts 1:8 After the Apostles received this power, they would immediately send out their testimony to the churches in Asia Minor, as Paul was traveling to visit these churches.
  6. Jesus final instructions were to tell people about Him everywhere; starting in Jerusalem, then the local communities surrounding Israel, and finally to the ends of the earth. Once again, unless this meant that a written testimony would be recorded and sent out, obeying Jesus’ command would not be possible.
  7. Just 14 years after Jesus was raised from the dead, we see Paul beginning his first missionary journey to Asia Minor, teaching this Gospel to the churches in these areas. If there was no written narrative, it would be impossible to accurately tell others about Jesus on this journey. Paul said that he received the Gospel direct from Christ: “Dear brothers and sisters, I want you to understand that the gospel message I preach is not based on mere human reasoning. I received my message from no human source, and no one taught me. Instead, I received it by direct revelation from Jesus Christ.” ~Galatians 1:11-12
  8. Luke begins his Gospel by telling us that “Many people have set out to write accounts about the events that have been fulfilled among us. They used the eyewitness reports circulating among us from the early disciples. Having carefully investigated everything from the beginning, I also have decided to write an accurate account.” ~Luke 1:1-3 Luke understood that writing an account of all that Jesus had said and done was of paramount importance. Certainly Luke wrote his Gospel early, before he wrote his second book, Acts.
  9. In Paul’s letter to the church at Ephesus, he speaks of “spreading this Good News. ~Ephesians 3:7. What would be the point of spreading the Good News if it did not include distributing the Good News by written letters to all of the churches in Asia Minor?
  10. At the church of Thessalonica, Paul thanks the Christians there for receiving the Gospel of Christ as it really is, the word of God; scripture equal to the Old
    Testament: “you received the word of God which you heard from us, you welcomed it not as the word of men, but as it is in truth, the word of God.” ~1 Thessalonians 2:13.
  11. In Acts 17:10-11, while at Berea, we see Paul before the Jews as they listened to him present the Gospel to them and their response: “to search the scripture to find out whether these things about Jesus were true.
  12. If there were no written testimonies about Jesus, recorded by the Apostles, stating what they had seen and heard from Jesus, and personally documenting the events of His healing miracles, raising the dead, crucifixion and resurrection, Paul would have nothing to present to the people in Asia Minor except his words. It is doubtful that without a written testimony from the men who saw Jesus crucified and risen on the third day, very few would become a believer in Jesus.
  13. When Paul and Silas went to the church at Thessalonica, they remained there for three consecutive Sabbaths (Acts 17:1-4). “He explained the prophecies and proved that the Messiah must suffer and rise from the dead. He said, “This Jesus I’m telling you about is the Messiah.” Unless there were written Gospels from the Apostles to demonstrate that these prophecies about the Messiah had been fulfilled, the people would not have believed in Jesus.
  14. In Paul’s letter to Timothy, chapter 5, verse 18, he quotes from Luke’s gospel. Paul: For the Scripture says, “You shall not muzzle an ox while it treads out the grain,” and, “The laborer is worthy of his wages.”  ~1 Timothy 5:18 When we examine Luke’s Gospel, we see that what Paul had written in 1 Timothy 5:18, came from what Luke had already written before in Luke 10:7. LukeAnd remain in the same house, eating and drinking such things as they give, for the laborer is worthy of his wages. Do not go from house to house.  ~Luke 10:7
  15. This dates the Gospel of Luke as written before Paul’s letter to Timothy—corroborating a very early writing for the Gospels. Luke’s Gospel was written after Matthew and Mark, as described in the first paragraph of Luke where he defines the source of his Gospel as coming from the eyewitness reports from the early disciples. ~Luke 1:1-4
  16. In 2 Peter 1:16-19, Peter recalls an event that is recorded in Matthew 17:1-6, Mark 13:26, and Luke 9:28-32. Jesus took Peter, James, and John up to a mountain and was transformed before their eyes into what He will look like when He returns to establish His kingdom on earth. Peter wrote after this event took place in 2 Peter chapter 1, meaning that the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke were already written when Peter wrote these words, as he refers back to these narratives in writing his later letter.
  17. In Luke 19:43-44, and Matthew 24:34, Jesus predicts the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple in 32 A.D., just before He is crucified. He states in Matthew 24:34, this will take place within one generation. A generation of judgement is described by Numbers 32:14, where the generation of those who complained against the Lord in the desert is defined as 40 years. Just 38 years later, Titus destroyed Jerusalem and left, “not one stone upon another” at the Temple, just as Jesus had predicted in Matthew 24:1-2.  The Epistle of Barnabas chapter 16.3, states that the destruction of Jerusalem happened in 70 A.D. Josephus describes 1.1 million Jews being killed at that time. This was the most important event to take place in the Jewish nation in the first century. Clearly the Gospels were written before 70 A.D., or it is certain that the writers would have written that this event took place and the words of Jesus were fulfilled.

These preceding facts allow us to determine that the Gospels of Christ must have been written very early in the first century, not later as critics assert. This means that these Gospels were written by the men who saw and heard the things they record in their Gospels. These men were eyewitnesses who have told us the truth about Jesus.

The New Testament and its internal texts, becomes evidence for us to examine, just as we would any other written texts from antiquity. When we study the entire New Testament we find that it is written sincerely, without contrivance, and it describes a uniform, central narrative about just one person, Jesus the Messiah.

The letters written by Paul afterwards, also confirm the same details as the four Gospels. Were did Paul get this information to share with all the churches in Asia Minor, of not from the written Gospels of the Apostles of Jesus?

The New Testament Tells Us When The Gospels Were Written

If anyone wants to know when the Gospels were written, all they must do is open a New Testament and begin to read the books of Acts and the letters that follow. Jesus was crucified and rose from the dead in 32 A.D. Fourteen years later in 46 A.D., Paul was on his first journey through Asia Minor.  In Acts chapter 13, Paul is at Antioch with Barnabas when the Holy Spirit tells them to go on this first missionary journey to preach the Gospel of Christ. “Now separate to Me Barnabas and Saul for the work to which I have called them.” ~Acts 13:2.

On the Sabbath, the elders of the synagogue at Antioch invite Paul to speak to the people gathered in Acts 13:22-39. Paul begins with David from the Old Testament and demonstrates how Jesus was his descendant, a fulfillment of God promise to David in 1 Samuel 13:14, and 16:1,13. Then Paul connects Jesus’ arrival to the promise of God to Abraham in Genesis 15.

From there, Paul describes the events we find in the four Gospels where Jesus is arrested, condemned by Pilate, placed on the cross and dies, is placed in the tomb of Joseph, and raised from the dead three days later. Paul finishes with his declaration that Jesus was seen alive for “many days,” and was seen by many eyewitnesses.

The people in Jerusalem and their leaders did not recognize Jesus as the one the prophets had spoken about. Instead, they condemned him, and in doing this they fulfilled the prophets’ words that are read every Sabbath. They found no legal reason to execute him, but they asked Pilate to have him killed anyway. “When they had done all that the prophecies said about him, they took him down from the cross and placed him in a tomb. But God raised him from the dead! And over a period of many days he appeared to those who had gone with him from Galilee to Jerusalem. They are now his witnesses to the people of Israel. ~Acts 13:27-31

Where did Paul get the information for this encounter with the Jews at Antioch? It was already recorded in the Gospels by 46 A.D. when Paul departed for His first missionary journey in Asia Minor. The evidence the Gospels were already written at this early date is proven by references in the book of Acts where Paul uses the testimony of the four Gospels to preach and teach. We also see in the letters after Acts that Paul refers to the Gospels in all his teaching about Jesus. Paul is preaching from the four Gospels in all four of his journey’s to the churches which are in Asia, beginning just 14 years after Jesus rose from the dead.

In Paul’s third journey through Asia Minor in 53-57 A.D., he passed through Ephesus, just 100 miles from the small church at Colosse. Paul wrote to Ephesus and declared that the Gospel of Christ was already in use at that time, and Paul was spreading this Good News within the first and second decades after Jesus’ resurrection.

By God’s grace and mighty power, I have been given the privilege of serving him by spreading this Good News. ~Ephesians 3:7

In Paul’s letter the Colossians he describes the Gospel of Christ as “being preached all over the world.” The Gospel was recorded by the four writers who testified to all they had seen and heard from Jesus. Here we see that what Jesus had accomplished during His life, death, and resurrection, was already recorded and carried by Paul to the churches he visited in Asia Minor, just 14 years later.

But you must continue to believe this truth and stand firmly in it. Don’t drift away from the assurance you received when you heard the Good News. The Good News has been preached all over the world, and I, Paul, have been appointed as God’s servant to proclaim it. ~Colossians 1:23

Jesus Commanded The 12 Apostles To Write And Send The Gospels Out To The World

Jesus called these twelve men to testify as eyewitnesses at that moment. All the miracles that they saw could never be repeated; yet all these things must be known to the world for all time. Jesus wanted the people of that moment who were still alive to know these things, and also every person throughout history.

In John’s Gospel Jesus promised that He would remind these men of everything they had seen and heard so they could write a reliable account. ~John 14:26

Jesus said that the Holy Spirit would testify of Him  to these men. Then they must testify about Him to the world, because they had been with Him from the beginning. ~John 15:26

The evidence that the Gospels were written immediately after Jesus rose from the dead, is found in the text itself where Jesus makes this requirement an imperative.

In Acts chapter 6, a dispute arose between the Greek Christians and the Hebrew Christians. The Greeks felt that the daily needs of their widows for food was not being taken care of, as it was for the Hebrew widows. The twelve Apostles decided to appoint seven men to oversee this daily distribution of food for these widows. What follows in this text is of critical importance.

And so, brothers, select seven men who are well respected and are full of the Spirit and wisdom. We will give them this responsibility. Then we apostles can spend our time in prayer and teaching the word. ~Acts 6:3-4

The reason the twelve Apostles gave for the appointment of these seven men, was so that they could spend their time in prayer and teaching the word. What word? It wasn’t the Old Testament scriptures only, it was also the Gospels. The Old Testament scriptures were not sufficient to prove Jesus was the Messiah without the testimony from the Apostles who described how they had seen Jesus fulfill all these prophecies. The Gospel accounts were essential in proving that Jesus had fulfilled the Hebrew prophecies of the Messiah.

The Apostles wanted to focus their efforts on teaching the word of God, these Gospels. Unless they were able to demonstrate that Jesus had fulfilled the Old Testament prophecies for the Messiah, as documented in the Gospels, they would never be able to prove Jesus was the true Messiah.

This demands that the Gospels must have already been written by this time. We know that Paul had not written any of his letters this early. He doesn’t even meet Jesus until Acts 9.

We know that the testimony of the Apostles who had written what Jesus had said and done, was carried to the church at Thessalonica. Paul writes that when they began to teach the people there what Jesus had said and done, they received these words as “the word of God.” Paul is not talking about the Old Testament scriptures. There would be no need to specify that the Old Testament was the word of God. The people already knew this. Paul is describing the words of the Apostles who had already written their testimony about Jesus as the Gospels. This is what Paul was teaching the people at the church at Thessalonica. These people accepted the Gospels as the word of God, scripture equal to the Old Testament.

For this reason we also thank God without ceasing, because when you received the word of God which you heard from us, you welcomed it not as the word of men, but as it is in truth, the word of God, which also effectively works in you who believe. ~1 Thessalonians 2:13

This is clear evidence that the Gospels must have already existed by this early date when Luke penned the book of Acts. Of course this is true because Acts is the second book of Luke, after his own Gospel.

There is absolutely no evidence anywhere that the Apostles waited for decades to write their testimony. This idea comes from a few liberal New Testament scholars as their opinions, but not because there is any proof that this is really true.

The text of the New Testament is where we find the evidence. It is by what Jesus said regarding His desire that these twelve men would tell everyone what they had seen, and the statements of these men who said they saw Jesus with their own eyes, that we can correctly understand that the New Testament was written by men who saw Jesus and heard Him. These men certainly did not wait, they began to write immediately after Pentecost and started to distribute these texts all over the world within a short period of time. They did this because Jesus told them to write a remembrance and tell the world immediately.

The Opinions Of Liberal Scholars

It doesn’t take long to notice that there are many opinions from many liberal scholars regarding the text of the New Testament. I have read a great number of the conclusions published by these men and women. There is one underlying principle that is true in a majority of these opinions: They make many assumptions that cannot be supported by evidence and often rely upon the conclusions of other scholars rather than what the text itself actually proves.

What this means is that there is no possibility of knowing who is right or if any group is correct in their conclusions regarding the New Testament.

We must ask ourselves if the men who wrote the New Testament at the beginning, intended that people later in history would have to rely upon the opinions of scholars in order to understand what the New Testament is saying.

I say no. Most of the 27 books of the New Testament are really just personal letters of communication between real persons. By standing over their shoulders and examining their conversations from afar, we learn a great deal about Jesus and the events that took place at that time. These letters are written matter-of-fact, not as myths, tales or novels. It is well known in examination of ancient literature that personal letters are not vehicles for fraud.

These letters were considered so valuable, accurate and instructive by people of that period, that they were copied tens of thousands of times and distributed all over the known world.

Evidence Of Ability To Write The Gospels

We don’t know what language the original autographs were written, or who it was that may have assisted the Apostles in transcribing them. We don’t know that the Apostles were not able to write Greek. We don’t know that the original autographs were first written in Aramaic or Hebrew and later copied as Greek texts. In the third decade of the second century, Papias said: “Matthew gathered the sayings of Jesus in the Hebrew tongue, and each person translated them as he was able.”[1]

We can’t accurately conclude what language the original autographs were written because they don’t exist any longer. There are no original autographs for any ancient texts of that age, secular or religious. All that we have today to prove any ancient event are the surviving manuscript copies. For this reason, no scholar can accurately state a precise date for their writing. For this reason, it is presumptuous to rely upon a scholar who claims to know these dates.

Luke writes at the beginning of his Gospel that he was very familiar with all of the events of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection, states that he personally interviewed the eyewitnesses who saw Jesus and heard Him. Luke was a Greek speaking Physician who was highly educated. Matthew was a tax collector and must certainly have acquired the ability to write well. The Romans would have required every tax collector to possess the ability to write and speak adequately in order to carry out their appointed tasks. Mark was a Greek speaking Jew, who was able to write in Greek, and was the scribe for Peter.

When we examine the text of Acts 21:37, we see that Paul was also able to speak Koine-Greek.

Then as Paul was about to be led into the barracks, he said to the commander, (in Greek λληνιστ“May I speak to you?” He replied, “Can you speak Greek? ~Acts 21:37

The commander of the barracks was surprised that Paul, a Jew, could speak Koine-Greek. From this we can demonstrate that Paul, a proficient scholar of the Pharisees, was also able to assist the writers of the Gospels in writing their texts in Greek, if this was necessary.

Could Uneducated Men Write The Gospels?

Ehrman often states that the writers of the four Gospels were uneducated men who did not have the capacity to write the elegant Koine-Greek text we see in the New Testament. He refers to Acts chapter 4 where Peter and John are standing before the council of leaders at Jerusalem. In this text we find the statement: “they could see that the Apostles were ordinary men with no special training in the Scriptures.”

From this statement, Ehrman has concluded that it was impossible for these men to have the skill necessary to write the Gospels. The problem is that Ehrman leaves out the rest of the text which helps the reader understand how uneducated men could have the ability to write what we find in the four Gospels. “They also recognized them as men who had been with Jesus.” It was Jesus who gave these uneducated men the ability to understand and communicate everything that He had said and done during His three and one-half years of ministry. Jesus told these men: “But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name, He will teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all things that I said to you.” ~John 14:26

It was these unique abilities to remember and write all they had seen and heard that Jesus imparted to these men, which made it possible for them to write what we see today in the New Testament.

Differing Opinions For When Were the Gospels Were Written

Surprisingly, this depends upon whom you ask. Conservative scholars often date the New Testament Gospels much earlier that liberal scholars. We might ask why this is true, if there is so much written by so many who claim to be scholars, shouldn’t there be a general consensus amongst alleged experts?

Many conservative scholars write that the Gospels of Matthew was written from early 60 A.D., to 80 A.D. Turning to the guidance of liberal scholars, both analyzing the same texts, they conclude that Matthew was written from 80 A.D. to 100 A.D.

Conservative scholars state that the Gospels of John was penned near 60 A.D. to 100 A.D. Again, looking at the same evidence, liberal scholars conclude that John’s Gospel was written from 90 A.D. to 100 A.D.

From seeing these varying dates by scholars we realize that either there is some degree of bias from both sides regarding the actual dates, or both sides don’t really know when the Gospels were written.

I have written extensively in proving from the historical record that Jesus died in 32 A.D. Before Jesus went to the cross He told His disciples that after He was crucified, risen from the dead, and returned to heaven, He would send the Holy Spirit who would empower these 12 men who saw and heard all that He did, the ability to remember everything He said and did during the three and one-half years of His public ministry.

These things I have spoken to you while being present with you. But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name, He will teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all things that I said to you. ~John 14:25-26

After Jesus was risen from the dead, again He reminded these 12 men that He had called them specifically to be His witnesses, and to immediately take all they had seen and heard and reveal it to the whole world.

What Does The Evidence Prove?

Listen to what Jesus told the Apostles after He had risen from the dead:

“You will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes upon you. And you will be my witnesses, telling people about me—everywhere—in Jerusalem, throughout Judea, in Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.” ~Acts 1:8

Does this sound to you like Jesus wanted these twelve men who had seen the most spectacular events in the history of the world, to wait 20, 30, 40 years or more before they wrote a record of all that Jesus had said and done?

Jesus called these twelve men to testify as eyewitnesses at that moment. All the miracles that they saw could never be repeated; yet all these things must be known to the world for all time. Jesus wanted the people of that moment who were still alive to know these things, and also every person throughout history.

In John’s Gospel, Jesus promised that He would remind these men of everything they had seen and heard so they could write a reliable account. ~John 14:26

Jesus said that the Holy Spirit would testify of Him  to these men. Then they must testify about Him to the world, because they had been with Him from the beginning. ~John 15:26

The evidence that the Gospels were written immediately after Jesus rose from the dead, is found in the text itself where Jesus makes this requirement an imperative.

There is absolutely no evidence anywhere that these men waited for decades to write their testimony. This idea comes from a few New Testament scholars as their opinions, but not because there is any proof that this is really true.

How could any scholar know the precise decade when the Gospels were written? Those who guess say later; those who read Jesus’ words, see He said: “What you see, write in a book and send it now..” The two Gr. imperatives “write” (γρφω) and “send” (πμπω) are peremptory, authoritative aorists. “Do It Now!”

Until it can be proven by evidence that the Gospels actually were written late in the first century, I will maintain an early date for their writing. There is no proof they were written late, there is tremendous internal proof within the New Testament the Gospels were immediately written.

What Did The Writers Intend?

It is inconceivable that these writers wrote in such a way that their texts were shrouded in mystery and the meaning of what they wrote could not be understood by even the least educated persons.

If we need scholars to tell us whether the text is reliable, has been changed, or really records actual events, then the God who claims to be the author of these texts must be an impotent God, incapable of ensuring that His words could survive intact for the world to read.

The writers of the New Testament state in their narratives that all that they are saying, even they themselves did not understand or believe at first. It is a common agreement amongst the writers that the miracles they saw Jesus perform and the raising of Lazarus from the dead, did not fully convince them at first. It was not until after Jesus was brutally crucified and these men knew that He was dead, and they saw Jesus alive in the flesh, that they really believed that He is the Messiah and God in human flesh.

The New Testament Prefaced By The Old

Any person who has adequately studied the Old Testament prophecies of the Messiah, understands that these texts make it clear that God would send the world a Messiah who would have the power of miracles to validate that He is the One whom God sent. These prophecies also state that He would be crucified and raised on the third day. There are over 400 of these Messianic Prophecies that I have personally documented and published in two books, which fully validate that Jesus is the only person in the history of the world who has completed these prophecies with great precision.

If Jesus had failed to fulfill even one of these prophecies, He could not be the Messiah. The fact that He did complete these predictions with such care and precision, is testimony to the power that God has to accomplish all that He promised.

Who Is Telling The Truth?

If we start with the assumption that the writers of the New Testament are honest men who are telling the truth about what they recorded, then we do not need the opinions and conclusions of modern scholars. The texts of the New Testament have survived for nearly 2,000 years, intact, with virtually all of the fundamental truths about Jesus coming to us with no substantial alterations to the original text. We have greater surviving manuscripts to validate these events that are described in the New Testament than any other event in the history of the world. The comments and conclusions of modern critical scholars are completely based upon their own opinions that originate by speculation and conjecture.

All we must do is read the New Testament for ourselves to see whether the narratives about Jesus make sense, are credible, and are trustworthy. After nearly 45 years of just studying the text of the New Testament apart from the opinions and conclusions of other scholars, I am convinced that this is all that is necessary.

If we begin with the idea that God exists and He has the power and technology to conceive, engineer, and produce the universe we inhabit, then it is no stretch of the imagination to accept that He also has the power to communicate a message to us through men that He might choose, and preserve their testimony intact so that every person on earth might have a reliable copy to read.

The following are the resources available at this site which contain evidence to prove each of these important issues:

  1. When Were The Gospels Written?
  2. Were The Gospels Written By Eyewitnesses?
  3. Did The Gospel Writers Borrow From Each Other?
  4. Has The Text Of The New Testament Been Changed?
  5. Is The New Testament Filled With Errors?
  6. Were The Four Gospels Written Anonymously?
  7. The Body Of New Testament Evidence
  8. Are There Sources For Jesus Outside The New Testament?
  9. Is The New Testament A Valid Historical Narrative?
  10. Did Jesus Really Claim To Be God?

NOTES:

[A] Surviving New Testament Manuscripts Dated 130-225 A.D.:
We have P52 from 130 A.D., with the text of Jesus’ trial before Pilate in a Codex. It is certain that there was an original autograph (original writing) that is dated much earlier. It would not be unrealistic to conclude that the original autograph was written in the middle of the first century, immediately after the events of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection.

From 150-200 A.D., we have P66, P72, and P75., with most of P66 from John’s Gospel, from 200 A. D., known as a first copy. This is evidence that a early first century original autograph was written for John’s Gospel immediately after Jesus death and resurrection. There are 101 references in John’s Gospel to Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection.

P72 is our earliest copy of Jude’s epistle, with one reference to Jesus’ resurrection, and two epistles of Peter, who vividly describes Jesus death and resurrection in 12 references.

P75, from 175-225 A.D., contains Luke’s Gospel, with 13 references to Jesus’ death and resurrection. Also, the earliest of John’s Gospel with 18 references to Jesus’ death and resurrection.

The Diatessaron, from 170 A.D., contains all four Gospels, and has a total of 301 references to Jesus’ death and resurrection (Matthew: 30, Mark: 37, Luke: 32, John: 101)

From 200 A. D.: P45, P46, and P47, contain surviving manuscript copies from all four gospels, and Acts (P45), with 30 references to Jesus’ death and resurrection,

P46 is the earliest New Testament Codex Manuscript in existence, dated at 175-225 A.D. It contains the following letters written by Paul:

Romans 1:1–5:17
Romans 5:17–6:14
Romans 6:14–8:15
Romans 8:15–11:35
Romans 11:35–14:8
Romans 14:9–15:11
Romans 15:11–Hebrews 8:8
Hebrews 8:9–9:10
Hebrew 9:10–26
Hebrews 9:26–1 Corinthians 2:3
1 Corinthians 2:3–3:5
1 Corinthian 3:6–2 Corinthians 9:7
2 Corinthian 9:7–end, Ephesians, Galatians 1:1–6:10
Galatians 6:10–end, Philippians, Colossians, 1 Thessalonians 1:1–2:3
1 Thessalonians 2:3–5:5
1 Thessalonians 5:5, 23–28
1 Thessalonians 5:28–2 Thessalonians, Philemon; 1–2 Timothy, and Titus

[1] Eusebius Ecclesiastical History 3.39.16
[2] F.F. Bruce, New Testament History, 1983, pp. 345.
[3] Bunson, Matthew (2009). Encyclopedia of the Roman Empire. Infobase Publishing. ISBN 978-1-4381-1027-1Archived from the original on 2016-05-07. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
[4] ibid.